The CMO’s Holiday Wishlist: 5 Suggestions for Stressed-Out Execs

December 22, 2016 Amelia Ibarra (Admin)

It’s that time of year again—twinkling lights, roaring fireplaces, hot chocolate, and stressed out executives. What would the tail end of December be without your CMO pulling his hair out while he agonizes over EOY reports and planning? Between trying to hit projected Q4 numbers, gathering big-picture metrics for the C-suite, and efficiently allocating budget for next year, there’s not a lot of time left to enjoy the holiday cheer.

While the end of the year may feel like the end of the world to your CMO or Marketing VP, there are ways to simplify these activities and alleviate the season’s biggest pressures. Below, we’ve compiled a short-n-sweet holiday wishlist for any marketing exec looking to kick off the new year with a little less stress (and a little more hair):

1. Marketing’s ROI

If there’s a sole metric that emboldens marketers across the board, it’s ROI. It proves what the team has delivered for the business, gives everyone a clear view of what he or she has accomplished, and helps managers and execs make more well-informed decisions about what to plan next. If your CMO can easily derive marketing’s ROI, he can prepare for high level metrics meetings without breaking a sweat.

2. A team that pulls its own reports from one place

If Demand Gen Dave, Content Carrie, and Marketing Ops Marvin can quantitatively show the successes or missteps of their individual campaigns, the CMO or VP only has to worry about compiling and delivering higher level reports and analysis. And if all the team’s reports are easily accessible and located in the same place, putting it all together to present the bigger picture becomes a piece of cake.

3. Reliable projections made from reliable metrics

By making sure all across-the-team metrics are up-to-date, accurate, and robust, your CMO will have an easier time predicting what the business can expect from your team in the quarters ahead. When it comes to next quarter’s campaign results and upcoming budgeting priorities, reliable data means reliable projections—and that means a more satisfied CEO and Board of Directors, and a more confident marketing executive.

4. An excellent relationship with sales

It’s no secret that marketing and sales teams can have contentious relationships. It takes frequent meetings and the right metrics to instill a sense of trust and camaraderie between the two teams—and that’s not always the simplest feat. But if your CMO can definitively demonstrate the role that marketing plays in the sales process—and vice versa—then everyone has a reason to come together and celebrate mutual wins.

5. A rock-solid ABM plan

While most of today’s B2B marketers are busy developing and deploying account-based marketing strategies for their businesses, a lot of them struggle to come up with truly effective plans. CMOs who can pinpoint, measure, and analyze their biggest campaign successes are better equipped to develop strategies that perform well. By digging into the tactics that have worked best in the past, marketing execs can set themselves up for less uncertainty and stress in the future.

By crossing these items off their wishlists, marketing executives can ensure peace of mind this holiday season—and a much happier new year.

Learn more about how you can simplify reporting now and throughout the year by watching Effective Metrics from CMO to Specialist or downloading The B2B Marketer’s Guide to Tactical Reporting.

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The CMO’s Holiday Wishlist: 5 Suggestions for Stressed-Out Execs

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